National Elephant Appreciation Day

September 22 is National Elephant Appreciation Day, and rightly so!

Did you know…

  • Elephants produce offspring until they are around 50 years old.
  • Elephants cry, play, and laugh.
  • Elephants grieve at the loss of a fellow elephant.
  • Elephants don’t actually drink with their trunks; they use them to suck up water and pour it into their mouths.
  • An elephant goes through a total of 6 sets of teeth in his/her lifetime. 1 tooth can weight more than 11 lbs.
  • Elephants are the only mammals that cannot jump.

 

Click HERE to discover more interesting facts about this majestic creature.

Unfortunately, African, Asian, and Pygmy elephants are classified as endangered species. At the turn of the 20th century, there were a few million African elephants and about 100,000 Asian elephants. Today, there are an estimated 450,000 – 700,000 African elephants and between 35,000 – 40,000 wild Asian elephants. There are now believed to be only about 1200 Pygmy elephants left in existance. Their lives are being threated at the hands of humans through illegal poaching and habitat loss. Ivory dealers are plotting to reopen legal ivory trade, meaning nearly all hope will be lost for the elephant species. Illegal hunting and black market trade are already almost too much to combat.

Fortunately, there is something we can do to help.
Many global foundations have started campaigns to conserve habitats, reduce poaching and other human related violence towards elephants, and increase protection for these animals. World Wildlife Fund has created  Asian Rhino and Elephant Action Strategy and the African Elephant Program.

Click HERE to visit World Wildlife Fund’s elephant page to learn more about the plight of this marvelous creature and ways that WWF is trying to help.

Click HERE to adopt an elephant through WWF! It makes a great gift to any wildlife/animal lover! I know I’d love one…hint, hint!

All money paid for an elephant adoption goes towards equipment and technology to protect the elephants from poachers and to other elephant conservation programs.

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